low-carb blueberry scones featured

Low-Carb Blueberry Scones

posted in: Recipes

Low-carb blueberry scones are a nice transition recipe as a means of introducing other nonketo dieters into the world of delicious ketogenic foods.

The blend of almond and coconut flour is an gluten-free and grain-free base for the eggs, coconut oil and blueberries.

With only two bowls, a spoon, and a baking sheet, this recipe couldn’t be simpler.

Like many of my recipes from The Ultimate Guide to Low-Carb Baking, this procedure follows the easy process of mixing all the wet ingredients in one bowl and they dry ingredients in another.

Combine the two together, fold in the berries and you have yourself some lovely low-carb blueberry scones after just 30 minutes of bake time.

The tartness of our blueberries gave a great flavor and inspired me to add some lemon or lime zest in the next batch.

This most may contain affiliate links. Primal Edge Health LLC may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you for any orders made through these links. All thoughts and opinions are my own and I never promote something I wouldn’t use myself.

Fresh v Frozen Blueberries?

low-carb blueberry scone upclose

You can use either. If the berries are still frozen when you mix them into the batter, this may affect the baking time. Frozen berries might increase the baking time by 5 to 10 minutes.

Tristan and I go back and forth on this question. He is convinced he can tell a difference with the frozen and prefers fresh, but for me, it isn’t so clear. I’m fine either way.

A strategy I do employ is to thaw the frozen blueberries before baking, this brings us to a happy middle ground where I get to tap in to my frozen stash of summer blueberries and he gets to enjoy delicious scones. Win, win.

Blue, Black or Red

I’m a fan of consuming local, seasonal produce. The blueberries can be replaced with other berries of your choice. Blackberries, red raspberries or strawberries, or any other local specimen should work fine with this recipe. Bonus points if you forage the berries yourself! We’ve made strawberry and strawberry/blueberry scones.

We’ll Sugar-Coat for it You

And we can by using a keto-approved low glycimic, zero calorie sweetener called Lakanto. It is a special blend of erythritol and monk fruit extract. For us, the monk fruit extract brings added nutritional benefits and value to the erythritol. We purchase directly from Lakanto’s store. In this recipe, we use their “golden” which is a brown sugar sub, you could also use the “classic” version or just plain erythritol- whatever works best for you!

Use the coupon code “primaledgehealth” and save 20%!

It was Tristan’s idea to add a finishing coat of the sugar-free sweetener over the top of the unbaked scones. The final result has a crunchy “sugar” topping.

Watch the recipe video for low-carb blueberry scones here.

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low-carb blueberry scones featured

Low-Carb Blueberry Scones

A family friendly low-carb blueberry scone made with a simple prep method and basic ketogenic ingredients.
3.8 from 10 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 8 scones
Calories: 151kcal

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 350° F. Lightly grease a baking sheet or small pizza pan with coconut oil.
  • Combine the dry ingredients in a small bowl.
  • In a second bowl, whisk the nut milk, coconut oil, eggs and vanilla. Reserve the blueberries. Fold this wet bowl into the dry bowl; continue gently mixing until dough forms. Fold in blueberries.
  • Shape the scones on a baking sheet in 8 discs or form a circle on a pizza pan and divide into 8 even sections. Separate the pieces a bit so they do not stick together while baking. Sprinkle additional Lakanto on the tops, if desired.
  • Bake for 20 to 30 minutes, until golden brown on the edges. Let cool completely before serving.

Video

Nutrition

Calories: 151kcal | Carbohydrates: 8g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 13g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Cholesterol: 1mg | Sodium: 82mg | Potassium: 55mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 10IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 42mg | Iron: 1mg
Tried this recipe?Mention @PrimalEdgeHealth or tag #pehrecipe so I can repost my favs!

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low-carb blueberry scones

30 Responses

  1. Karl
    | Reply

    I made these and they are just amazing. These will be my go to for breakfast from now on, I put some butter on one and put it in the microwave and wow taste’s better than what I remember “real” scones to taste like. For anyone out there wondering what to try for breakfast (or dessert) 100% try these they are also one of the easiest things I’ve made! They are so good I’m debating whether I should buy the book or not now. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

    https://imgur.com/Amy4FU9

  2. Tera Finley
    | Reply

    So yummy!! My boys loved them. My 7 year old said: “I could eat these all day!” I will have to double the recipe next time. I blinked and they were gone! Thank you for sharing your recipes and for all of the wonderful videos.

    • Tristan
      | Reply

      MOM-WIN!

  3. Marcy
    | Reply

    I made these yesterday and my kids LOVED them…..they are already asking me to make more. I was impressed at how good they were and how easy they were to make. Thank you!!!

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Awesome! I love the success story! Jessica

  4. Shane
    | Reply

    Holy cow so good! Really enjoy you two! Keep it up!!!

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Yay! So glad they are a hit with you 🙂

  5. Diana a soler
    | Reply

    how many calories eacn piece?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      You’ll have to do the math. We don’t count calories – just marcos. Multiply 9 cal per g of fat, 4 cal per g of protein/carb

  6. Therese Bizabishaka
    | Reply

    Hi. Made these twice and they are a nice treat. I want my children to eat low carb treats but they can’t stand coconut oil or flour. Even in this recipe they picked it up. I assume I could just sub melted butter for the coconut oil but if I wanted to use just almond flour how much extra would I use to replace the coconut flour?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Yes, you’re right sub butter for coconut flour in equal amounts. If you want to replace the coconut flour, I’d start by using the same amount (1/4 cup) also. Take a look at the dough before you bake it, should be thick and press out without being too sticky.

  7. Joanna
    | Reply

    Thank-you Jessica for such an easy and successful recipe. I live in the UK and served them with clotted cream – an English specialty! They were super yum!!

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      What a delight to have with clotted cream! I’m glad you enjoy the recipe 🙂

  8. Pam
    | Reply

    What is lakanto classic?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      You can click on the link in the recipe list or here also.

  9. Sarah
    | Reply

    Hi again after having a Google I’m thinking I should make my own almond flour to combat the cost… however should I be soaking, removing the skins? I see the brand you recommend has the skins intact and therefore haven’t been soaked…I’m new to all this but was under the impression that unsoaked nuts are hard for us to digest and contain a lot of anti nutrients.

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Sarah, As I detail in my baking guide – you can make it with or without the skins. That’s the difference between almond flour vs almond meal. For your son, coconut flour recipes might be the best alternative. If you wanted to swap out different nuts… they are all likely going to be as expensive or more so. Pumpkin seed flour and sunflower seed flour would be better, more affordable options. But in some recipes, they may act slightly different than the delicate, fluffy almond flour would. Probably not too much of an issue if you aren’t a keto bakery!

  10. j
    | Reply

    Hello if i want to use liquid stevia, how much shoul i use instead of lakanto?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Depends on your taste, probably 1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon. Start with 1/4 tsp, give the dough a test taste and see what you think.

  11. Kiah
    | Reply

    Just made this for breakfast-delicate, subtle sweetness & easy to make. Thank you!

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      I love the easy and simplicity too! Thanks Kiah 🙂

  12. Dani
    | Reply

    Just wanted to thank you for a great recipe! I actually doubled the recipe for 8 because I have a special scone pan with the 8 sections and this one only filled them halfway. They came out super flaky and tender! Also subbed blueberries for cranberries since I happened to have those in the freezer…added a nice bite. I’ve tried many Keto scone recipes but this is by far the best.

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      MMMM, I like the idea of crandberries! Maybe with a little lemon zest too? YUM 😉 Thanks for sharing!

  13. Amy
    | Reply

    Hi Jessica! I was wondering if I could possibly swap out the almond flour and use only coconut flour?
    Also, do you think I could do the same with your coffee cake recipe? 🙂

    • Tristan
      | Reply

      You can always try it 🙂 Almond flour give a light and fluffy texture to the recipes. Coconut flour is much more dense and would create a different result.

  14. Maria Pereira
    | Reply

    Is the coconut oil to be used to grease the pan or included with the wet ingredients? Looking forward to making this soon. 🙂

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Coconut oil is included in the wet ingredients. I see how that could be confusing and will update the directions now.

  15. Maria Pereira
    | Reply

    I just made these today and they are delicious. I did forget the salt but still tasted good. Mine broke apart quite a bit, not sure why. I substituted the vanilla for some lemon extract. I will definitely be making these again! 😋

  16. Judy
    | Reply

    Hi.
    I made this recipe exactly as stated and the dough was too wet?
    I should have added more flour?
    They tasted good, but were thin-did not rise much?
    Don’t know what was wrong?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      I haven’t been able to replicate this problem. If you follow the directions and use the exact ingredients, the scones should come out nicely, although they don’t rise a significant amount, never like a wheat based recipe would. You could add more flour, 1 tbsp at a time until the dough is thick to your liking.

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