The BEST All-Purpose Keto Bread

The BEST All-Purpose Keto Bread

I have formulated the BEST all-purpose keto bread – soft on the inside, crusty on the outside. Finding low-carb alternatives to your favorite grain or startch-based foods can a lot of trial and error. Well, now I’ve taken the guess work out of the equation and am very happy to present this recipe.

This could be the ONLY bread replacement you need.

Listed as the first recipe in The Ultimate Guide to Low-Carb Baking, this is the best all-purpose keto bread! From Cinnamon French Toast to grilled cheese, you can do anything with it. Use it for “breadcrumbs”, soaking up sauces and dipping into soups.

All-purpose keto bread sliced

ONLY TWO CARBS per slice!

The satisfyingly bready combination of coconut flour, psyllium husk powder, egg and oil adds up to Macros Per Slice: 9.8 g fat, 7 g carb, 2 g net carb, 3.9 g protein

Psyllium husk powder?

Psyllium husk powder is the special ingredient essential for creating a light, spongy, wheat-bread like texture. Generally, recipes with psyllium husk have longer baking times but it is well worth the wait. This all-purpose keto bread is 100% satisfying, so far it has held up well against all tests (sandwiches, soaking up soups, French toast, grilled cheese…).

Use psyllium husk powder, not psyllium husk! The powder combines well in the bread dough and makes a smooth textured bread once baked. If you use the whole husk, it does not incorporate well into the dough and will leave grainy bits in your bread. These little bits get gritty after getting baked. Avoid the disappointment and be sure to use psyllium husk powder.

Shopping Suggestion: Finely Ground Psyllium Husk Powder

Our favorite Keto Bread Recipe | All purpose grain-free low-carb bread

This keto bread rises well thanks to the abundance of eggs. Little air bubbles burst open creating beautiful pockets, just like white bread! My favorite element of this keto bread is the crunchy outside that encases a soft flexible inside. The crust is a crisp shell, reminiscent of French bread. The loaf slices easily and has never gummed up on the knife.

Compared to other coconut flour loaves…

Speaking of French bread, I use my Grain-Free Coconut Flour Bread as a French Bread replacement. With different ratios of coconut flour to egg and the lack of psyllium, it does not rise at all. Simple to make, the directions walk you through the process of blending the batter, packing into a loaf pan and baking. Once you remove it from the oven, you have a nice dense loaf. It is much smaller in size and better suited for bruschetta, toasted garlic bread, and serving with pesto or olive tapanade as you would French bread.

The Grain-Free Coconut Flour Bread was my first successful keto bread recipe and I have used it often! It is very nice when you want just a little texture and extra bulk to a meal. In The Ultimate Guide to Low-Carb Baking, I provide a number of fun flavor variations and ways to enhance it with herbal infused oils and medicinal spices.

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All-Purpose Keto Bread Featured Image
The BEST All-Purpose Keto Bread
A WONDERFUL keto, low-carb bread, the ONLY bread replacement you need. It is perfect for all traditional bread uses.
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Servings: slices
Units:
The BEST All-Purpose Keto Bread
A WONDERFUL keto, low-carb bread, the ONLY bread replacement you need. It is perfect for all traditional bread uses.
Print Recipe
Print this recipe
Servings: slices
Units:
All-Purpose Keto Bread Featured Image
Rating
Votes: 42
Rating: 3.64
You:
Rate this recipe!
Servings 16slices
Prep Time 15minutes
Cook Time 50minutes
Ingredients
Ingredients
Rating
Votes: 42
Rating: 3.64
You:
Rate this recipe!
Servings 16slices
Prep Time 15minutes
Cook Time 50minutes
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350° F. Grease a bread pan.
  2. **SEE UPDATE IN RECIPE NOTES** Mix psyllium and warm water together in a small bowl. Set aside to gel. Combine the remaining dry ingredients in a second bowl. Mix the egg and oil in a third bowl.
  3. Combine the egg and oil with the dry bowl. Stir well. Add the psyllium. Transfer to a food processor or use an electric mixer to blend again thoroughly.
  4. Transfer dough to the bread pan. Smooth the top.
  5. Bake for 60 minutes, until the top is browned and a knife comes out clean after being inserted in the center.
  6. Remove from the oven. Leave to cool in the bread pan for 15 minutes. Loosen the edges with a knife and release the loaf from the pan. Place on a wire rack to cool completely before slicing.
Recipe Notes

Macros Per Slice: 9.8 g fat, 7 g carb, 2 g net carb, 3.9 g protein

**UPDATE**

  1. You can follow the same recipe as above without premixing the psyllium and water. Make a bowl of all the dry ingredient and make a second bowl of all the wet. Combine the two bowls and transfer into a greased bread pan. Bake as usual. This will help avoid any odd clumping with the psyllium and ensure the batter is evenly mixed. (11/9/17)
  2. If the bread rises and then collapses in on itself, it needs to bake for 15 minutes more.

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86 Responses

  1. Marilyn Zimmerman
    | Reply

    Looks scrumptious! I will most definitely be trying this recipe ☺️ I also have a question pertaining to breastfeeding while in ketosis. I have been doing the ketogenic diet for the last few months and have lost around 18 pounds and now am where I was before pregnant. Though I still weigh much more than I should and would like to continue losing weight maybe a bit slower. I feel good on it though I find I have to consume a bit more carbs so my milk supply doesn’t get too low, I’m guessing around 50 – 60 grams a day, (I never did check on an app ). I am constantly studying about the keto diet and there’s a lot of confusion online about breastfeeding and the ketogenic diet. Just recently I read an article Dr mercola wrote about ketosis but he advised against doing this diet while breastfeeding saying women need oxaloacetate, a compound essential for creating lactose in breastmilk, which is essential for baby’s growth. So I did some more research and came across an article that states your body can make oxaloacetate from protein too..? I really do not want to harm my baby’s development… So as one suggestion, to get more carbs and lactose to your baby is by consuming milk (I would do raw, grass-fed) and it wouldn’t affect your blood glucose much… And so I’m pondering what to make of all this… Any suggestions?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      I can only share my own personal experience, in which I never had any problems with milk flow or postpartum recovery. I’ve been breastfeeding fine for the last year, no problems. You must follow your heart, body and mind 😉 I know it isnt easy to sort through all the info. Try different approaches to diet and see what works best for you. If your baby feels healthy, you feel healthy and all signs are positive, dont let others plant negative thoughts and doubt in your mind. Our baby is 1 yo and HUGE, strong and alert. Very healthy.

      • Jen Mangano
        | Reply

        I tried to make this today. Following the updated instructions. It came out of the oven perfectly risen and looked great. I let it cool for the 15 minutes, it reduced in size by more than half and its incredibly eggy and dense. Not sure what mistake I might have made here. Any advice?

        • Jessica Haggard
          | Reply

          HI Jen! Were you able to put it back it into the oven and cook it more? That’s what I would do. Next time you make it, you can increase the cooking time and/or temperature.

  2. Marilyn Zimmerman
    | Reply

    PS. baby is 4 months old and gaining well. Everyone comments on how chubby he is ☺️

  3. Chasity Dix
    | Reply

    If we have Psyllium husk, could we turn it into a powder with a high speed blender like a Vitamix?

    • Tristan
      | Reply

      i would think so, although I have not tried that personally

    • Anne
      | Reply

      I have actually ground psyllium husks in a grinder successfully (I used a small coffe/spice grinder)

    • Ange
      | Reply

      Yes I used a Nutribullet and it worked rally well.

      • Pippa
        | Reply

        I grinded mine in a small processor and the bread came out delicious!

        • Jessica Haggard
          | Reply

          Thanks Pippa, great idea – I’m going to remember this tip

  4. Anne
    | Reply

    The recipe calls for a fluid ounce measurement for coconut flour – should that just read ounces?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Must have been a mistake with the plugin – use 3/4 cup coconut flour

  5. Harsh Kabra
    | Reply

    For the recipe have 6 tbsp of pre-powdered Psyllium husk or 6 tbsp of whole Psyllium husk and then powdered it? Because 1 tbsp of powdered Psyllium husk weighs about 9 to 10grams where as1 tbsp of whole Psyllium husk weighs about 6 to 7grams.
    Also what size loaf pan(dimensions) are you guys using?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      6 tbsp psyllium husk powder. Using an 8×4 inch bread pan

  6. Barbara
    | Reply

    Wonderful bread. Great texture. Easy and fast to put together. Baked this yesterday using an 8-1/2 x 4-1/2 inch pan and it rose beautifully. Also, I bought a bag of psyllium husk at the Bulk Barn (in Canada) and used our Blendtec blender to powder it. It worked a treat and saved money too. We’ll definitely make this regularly from now on. Thanks for the excellent recipe.

    • Tristan
      | Reply

      I’m happy it works for you!

  7. James
    | Reply

    Hi Jessica and Tristan. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe! Quick question. Would I be correct in saying the total calories per slice is 131.8 kcal based on the macros?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      We look at the macros and don’t tally up calories for our food

  8. Heather Leigh
    | Reply

    Just made this and it is so delicious! And one slice was enough, very dense therefore filling! Thank you for sharing!

  9. Megan
    | Reply

    Hi there! This sounds like a great recipe and I can’t wait to try it! I have one question…is there another flour I can use instead of coconut? I believe I may have a mild allergy/intolerance to coconut, and I’d like to know alternatives just in case. Thanks!!

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      I have only tried this with coconut flour. If you try something else and it works, please let me know!

  10. Tami
    | Reply

    I just tried to make the bread. Was not successful. My psyllium did not blend well It was chunky . Help what did I do wrong ?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Try following the same recipe but just working with a dry bowl (add the psyllium to the dry ingredients) and a wet bowl (add the water to the egg and oil) of ingredients. This keeps the psyllium and water separate until the two bowls are combined. Hope this works better for you!

  11. David Whitelaw
    | Reply

    Just made the bread. Rose beautifully but then fell when cooling. Is that normally?

  12. Bill Boucher
    | Reply

    Every time I try psyllium husk in a bread recipe, the bread ends up deep purple. I still eat it, but it looks nothing like the photos I see on line. Am I doing something wrong? The look really turns me off.

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      I’ve heard that happen a lot, seems like different brands of psyllium are more/less likely to turn purple. I’m not sure which brands are which, you are not the only one with purple bread, lol.

      • Nicole Cobe
        | Reply

        What brand of psyllium powder do you use? My bread is in the oven right now and I hope it doesn’t turn purple… but this vitacost brand I have does but I’m determined to use it up… I have used NOW brand prior and it didn’t turn purple

        • Jessica Haggard
          | Reply

          Haha, yes, I know about the purple bread! I recommend Mountain Rose Herbs for psyllium husk powder, they have excellent quality of all herbs, spices, teas and essential oils.

      • Bill Boucher
        | Reply

        I now have tried about 5 different brands. Every one looks like blueberry bread. I still eat them, but I close my eyes and choke it down. I call BS on this recipe. I am now done wasting this kind of money. Even if this was good bread, it is rediculously expensive.

        No fake bread for me.

  13. Saundra
    | Reply

    I have made this recipe 4 time and each time it rises beautifully and as soon as I pull it out of the oven it starts to sink in the middle. I’ve even cooked it 1 hour and 10 minutes and it still happens. What am I doing wrong?

  14. Maija
    | Reply

    thanks for the recipe!..i wish i would have taken a pic of this bread when it first came out of the oven..it was really tall, puffed up and impressive…then 10 minutes later..it kinda caved in on itself..:-(..did i do something wrong somewhere maybe?

  15. Jan
    | Reply

    Hi Jessicaand Tristan, Went to make the bread and when I added water to psyllium husk powder. It became a big clump and not enough water to moisten the powder. Is this correct? Thanks grandma

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Hi Jan! You can also follow the same recipe but just work with a dry bowl (add the psyllium to the dry ingredients) and a wet bowl (add the water to the egg and oil) of ingredients. This keeps the psyllium and water separate until the two bowls are combined. Hope this works better for you! Let us know what you think. We love you <3

  16. Sundari
    | Reply

    Thanks for this recipe! I was excited to find it as I’m doing keto right now and rather miss baking, which I used to do a lot of. So I made this bread yesterday, exactly to the modified recipe (dry/wet bowls, combine). It rose beautifully, I tested with a knife per recipe instructions, it came out clean, then I removed it from the oven. I had baked it for 55 minutes, then let it cool completely.

    By the time it cooled, the center had completely collapsed and caved in, alas! I sliced it up and tasted it, and saw that the bottom was compressed and gluey, with very few, tiny air holes in the top portion. There was also a very strong taste of baking soda. So this told me two things:

    1) it was underbaked
    2) as I suspected when I put the ingredients together, there was not enough acids for the baking soda to react with.

    Normally in a recipe with baking soda I would expect to see an appropriate amount of acid (traditional recipes often include vinegar, buttermilk, or yogurt for this effect, or else citrus, brown sugar/molasses, cocoa, etc). This recipe doesn’t have any real acids, though, so I wonder if the recipe means to call for baking powder? Given the amount called for, I think that might be the issue.

    Without the help of leavening powder of some kind, it’s essentially a soufflé, which means it’ll be more likely to collapse when cooling, especially if you drive a knife down the center and let out the air.

    Also, my bread was a totally different color, not at all brown on the inside, it was more the color of homemade white bread.

    I do really want this recipe to work, because I am thinking next time to try baking powder instead of soda, and to reduce the heat to about 325 and bake it for more like an hour and 20 minutes, to see if that helps (reducing the heat while extending the baking time will help keep the crust from burning while the inside fully cooks). I might also add some freshly ground chia and flax, and maybe some whole sesame seeds, to add more fat and fiber to the mix, once I get the basic recipe down.

    I’ll let you know how the experiments turn out!

    • Sundari
      | Reply

      Oh one more thing – I wonder what the dimensions are of the bread loaf pan you’re using, and what material it is (glass, metal, etc)?

      • Jessica Haggard
        | Reply

        My bread pan is an 8 by 4-inch, metal pan.

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Interesting thoughts here… this recipe as always worked for me and is now working for many many others, I’ve never had it be gummy or under-cooked. That being said, I have heard of this “rising perfectly and then falling” phenomenon from a handful of people. I know you can use yeast in place of baking soda, that seems to keep it light and fluffy. I’m very interested in how your experimenting comes out, I’m also inspired to try some variations myself – maybe adding poppy seeds on top and roasted garlic to the batter… As I continue to get feedback about this recipe I’ll keep updating notes here in the post so we can all explore the finer details together.

    • Tristan
      | Reply

      Follow your hunch on the bread being under baked. Have you tried it again with a longer baking time? Perhaps even a higher oven temperature as well?

    • Scott Gilmore
      | Reply

      Sundari – did you try other ingredients? Mine turned out just like yours. i even tried putting it back in the over for another 20 mins and it just got harder. I have now tried 2 x’s – not sure where to go from here. Don’t want to throw another loaf of ingredients away (they are not edible and I eat almost anything)

  17. Tracy Tepley
    | Reply

    Would you recommend using this bread to make a keto style stuffing for Thanksgiving?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      If you try it, let me know how it works!

      • Tracy Tepley
        | Reply

        The stuffing turned out great and the bread held up very well. One question I had was if I should grind my psyllium husk powder in my coffee grinder to get rid of the slightly sandy/gritty texture I am detecting or if there is a better brand to buy (I am using the NOW brand of powder). I seem to be the only one that detected it so I must be more sensitive but I do find it a bit off-putting.

        • Tristan
          | Reply

          I’m so happy to hear it worked as stuffing! That is great to hear. I prefer the ground powder to whole husk. You can blend it in a blender or coffee grinder. It is also available to purchase in powder.

  18. Sean Braganza
    | Reply

    Thank you Jessica and Tristan!

    Just put this in the oven. Will let you know how it goes. 🙂

  19. Katie
    | Reply

    As I read through previous comments… I wonder if the issue for the bread deflating has anything to do with living in a higher altitude?

    My question is how to store this bread. On the counter or fridge? And for how long! Thanks a bunch, I enjoyed making the bread.

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Katie, I slice the bread and keep it in the fridge or freezer. I like having some on hand in the freezer, it thaws quickly. Sometimes I “toast” it in butter on a frying pan while it is still frozen if I want it asap.

  20. Carminia
    | Reply

    Hi, how long will you cook this bread in conventional oven?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      As the recipe suggests. 60 minutes works for me. Some people see it rise and then collapse as it cools. It will still taste good but the collapsing indicates it can be baked for about 15 minutes longer.

  21. Keto FTW
    | Reply

    Has anyone tried making this with almond meal?

  22. Michelle
    | Reply

    I’ve made this recipe a half dozen times. It comes out perfect, has air bubbles, chewy w a crunch! I find that hot water blends it better in the food processor then warm water. I blend all liquid in the processor first, then add all dry and blend again. Nice and simple. It’s the best Keto Bread recipe online!
    Thank you!

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      How interesting about the affects from weather. Thanks for sharing your experience. I’m glad you like it! I plan to make another loaf tomorrow 🙂

  23. Andrea
    | Reply

    Thank you guys for the wonderful recipe! I´m so happy I´ve tried it. Today I´ve made this bread for the second time and I just love it so much! It tastes a bit “eggy” on its own, but when I eat it with something else it doesn´t bother me at all. It also freezes very well. Looking forward to your other recipes! Greetings from Slovakia 🙂

  24. Harvey Seidel
    | Reply

    I made this bread and it came out wonderfully. I seem to remember you saying you used only a teaspoon of baking powder and then added some vinegar. What is the details there? Also, I feel it is a bit flat or bland in taste. Can you add just a touch of sugar substitute? If so, how much? And last question, what about adding nuts to the mixture?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      I’m glad you like it! I did do an experiment with vinegar and less b soda but did not notice any difference in texture, flavor, or bake time. You can add a sweetener if you like, sugar is not what you want to use if you’re following a keto diet. We use Lakanto (and you can get 20% off without coupon code: primaledgehealth) as a keto-friendly sweetener. You can certainly add cinnamon and vanilla extract/powder as well. Savory herbs can be nice too – rosemary, etc maybe even some roasted garlic or at least garlic or onion powder. I like the taste and keep thinking about adding herbs etc but I know that I like the buttery flavor just as is so I keep it plain. Adding flavor will be to your taste, if you use Lakanto, it can be used in the same measurements as white sugar. I wouldn’t add nuts to the batter, in fear of getting an overly thick blend. You could sprinkle sunflower seends/poppy seeds/sesame seeds/pumpkin seeds on the top and press them in gently so they stick.

  25. Michelle T
    | Reply

    Thanks for the great recipe! I see that your recipe calls for either coconut oil or butter. Which do you prefer?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      I like the flavor of butter in this recipe. That reminds me I have a loaf in the oven RIGHT NOW and have to go check it!

  26. Deborah
    | Reply

    Hi 🙂 I made this last weekend but I did it all in the blender. Worked out fine and yes, best keto bread made yet after trying many. Didn’t rise quite as much but I used a slightly larger tin. Here’s how I did it if any one is interested:

    I put the eggs, water and melted butter in first, then blended well.
    Added all other ingredients then blended well – no probs with psyllium husk for me 🙂
    Scraped easily in to the tin and was remarkably good at not leaving bits behind!

    I used 4.5 tsps of baking powder as thought I didn’t have any baking soda (it’s bicarb of soda to us Brits – doh!) I also added 1 tsp cider vinegar because I think I read something in the comments about that – not sure what the chemistry idea was though.

    It made 14 slices 🙂

    Will use baking soda and smaller tin next time.

    I didn’t notice an overt egginess to it. I found the outer crusts pulled off like ‘normal’ bread (I like to dip those in my soup first) and the bread didn’t go (what I call ‘pappy’), soft and soppy when dipped in soup and first eaten. I also had the last bit saved to wipe round my bowl and it worked fine:)

    Thank you Jessica and Tristan. I was so impressed I brought The Edge book 😉

    All the best to you and yours 🙂

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Wow! What a great comment! Thanks for sharing all of this – I’m sure someone will find a lot of value. I tend to agree with you about the egginess. That is a very subjective taste and I like eggs so… no problem for me. I find the buttery flavor to be the strongest. I love the crust 🙂 Ahh this bread… *dreamy sigh* I made some yesterday. Just tested a keto stuffing recipe 🙂 Enjoy the book! Tag me @primaledgehealth if you share anything on Instagram so I can see what else you are up to! Much love!! Jessica

  27. James
    | Reply

    Thanks for the recipe, its in the oven, will come back and tell how its been.

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      How did it come out?

  28. David Lucas
    | Reply

    Just made , it came out well, but tastes and smells very eggy. Can you use egg whites only?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Yes, you can use 2 whole eggs and 6 egg whites instead

  29. Kate
    | Reply

    I’ve been looking for something to replace my munchies, and I think this might be it. However, I am not a fan of coconut, so would it be possible to substitute almond flour instead?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      I haven’t tried with Almond flour. If you make an experiment let me know how it comes out! Have you tried the Ketogenic Chocolate Chip Cookies? Those are munch worthy and nutritious.

  30. Karen Calabrese
    | Reply

    Looks good! Can this bread be made in a bread machine?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      I don’t have a bread machine, if you try it let me know!

  31. Monica
    | Reply

    I just made this and it looks and smells fantastic! I baked it for 1hr 15mins, and added 1tsp each of flax seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and pumpkin seeds. The psyllium husk powder I have make the loaf a rich dark brown, but not purple at all. It looks like a dark rye bread as far as color goes. Can’t wait to eat it!!!!! Thanks for the recipe.

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      WOW that sounds so good! We welcome you to share your pictures in our facebook group: Ketogenic Baking. Sounds like we’ll all be drooling 😉

  32. Ioana
    | Reply

    I keep seeing great keto recipes using psyllium husk powder. I am not sure where I can find it (ordering from Amazon isn’t an option where I live).

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      We love getting our herbs, spices and baking items from Mountain Rose Herbs. Can you order here?

  33. Mary
    | Reply

    My bread had a strong baking soda smell. What can i do different so it doesn’t smell like baking soda? I really like this recipe and would like to fix this

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      I have not noticed this smell in any of my loaves. Anyone have any ideas how to help?

  34. Jamie-Lee Rent
    | Reply

    Baked this bread last night. Rose well then slightly dropped in the middle. I probably could have baked it 15 minutes longer. But my question is today when I cut it its more of a banana bread texture inside, more dense and wet. Not dry and airy with bubble pockets. Is there something I can do or is this how its supposed to be?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      I’d go for 15 minutes longer! If it is wet in the middle = not baked all the way through.

  35. fireflygodt
    | Reply

    I made my lovely loaf. Mine didn’t rise but that’s my fault, I forgot the water. Talk about hand to the forehead. Anyway I tasted it and, even though it was dense it was good. So I slathered some goat cheese on a piece and went to town. It’s delicious. So I’ll be making it again.
    I used Psyllium husk powder from Sprouts and it worked fine. 😁

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      Hahaha! Thanks for sharing such an honest moment!! I’m glad you enjoyed it 😉

  36. Bella
    | Reply

    I followed the recipe exactly, using the method suggested only using two bowls (one for dry, one for wet ingredients).

    However the loaf has come out smelling and tasting super eggy and the loaf is damp inside. Didn’t add extra eggs as I followed the recipe.

    I’ve cooked it for the specified amount of time, let it cool, cut into it to find it’s damp then put it back in for another 15 (as recommended for those who found their loaf to sag – which wasn’t the case for me, no sagging loaf, just damp and eggy).

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      I’m sorry this didn’t work out for you! If you find it too eggy, you can try 6 egg whites and 2 whole eggs in place of the 8 whole eggs.

  37. catherine
    | Reply

    yes i made this bread came out perfect just abit eggie

  38. pippa411
    | Reply

    Hi I had made this bread using baking powder initially while following your video online and tasted great but I noticed my bread didnt have the same rise. I found out later on that it was baking soda instead of baking powder. Though I had a better rise using baking soda, I found that the bread started to have an ammonia smell after using baking soda. Is there something that I may be doing wrong with the recipe or would you suggest I use some apple cider vinegar or lemon to counteract the alkalizing effects of baking soda?

    • Jessica Haggard
      | Reply

      So interesting… is your baking soda old? Do you think it could have absorbed any smells from other items nearby? I use baking soda but don’t notice an ammonia smell. You can try with the vinegar to see if that helps. I have made it with bsoda + vinegar and didn’t notice a difference w/ or w/o the vinegar.

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